Nashville GLBT Chamber of Commerce responds to passage of non-discrimination bill

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In a press release issued Tuesday, the Nashville GLBT Chamber of Commerce (NGLBTCC) praised Metro Council for their passage of the non-discrimination bill.

On Tuesday night, Metro Council members passed the controversial ordinance on its final reading.

The Contract Accountability Non-Discrimination Ordinance (CANDO) requires vendors contracting with Metro Government to affirm that they will not discriminate in employment decisions based on sexual orientation or gender identity.

“There’s no cost to implement non-discrimination efforts for companies,” said Michael Fluck, NGLBTCC president.  “To commit to not discriminate costs nothing and shows a dedication to hiring and promoting the most talented individuals in any company.

The benefits to our greater Nashville community will be numerous as companies hire the best talent and grow business in Nashville based solely on performance and experience-based factors.”

The NGLBTCC noted the bill sponsors-Council Members Jamie Hollin, Mike Jameson, Erica Gilmore, Megan Barry, and Ronnie Steine.

"We also thank all the Council Members who voted YES," Fluck said. " We are grateful to Mayor Karl Dean for his support of the bill and his administration’s efforts to fight HB0598 and HB0600, two versions of the state Special Access to Discriminate Act that would take away the right of cities and counties to expand their non-discrimination ordinances."

Fluck also acknowledged the efforts of the Tennessee Equality Project, which spearheaded a grassroots effort that brought together more than 70 Nashville businesses, congregations, and community and labor organizations, including the NGLBTCC and several member businesses, to endorse the ordinance. In addition, more than 20 Nashville ministers publicly announced their endorsement.

“This ordinance is a positive step towards full equality in our area and we additionally thank all the supporters and the efforts of Tennessee Equality Project (TEP), he said.”