LifeFlight Adds Nurse Practitioners, Physicians to Expand Flight Crew

179
Ashley Brown Panas, MD, is assistant medical director of LifeFlight, which recently added several nurse practitioners and flight physicians. (photo by Jerry Jones)

NASHVILLE, Tenn. (July 27, 2020) – Patients treated and transported by Vanderbilt LifeFlight are now receiving a higher level of care thanks to the credentialing of more than 20 flight nurses as nurse practitioners and the addition of a flight physician at several LifeFlight bases.

Now, out of a staff of about 100 flight crew members, more than 25% are providing care at the nurse practitioner or physician level. Vanderbilt LifeFlight is one of a handful of flight programs across the country that provides this level of expertise of front-line emergency care. Most flight programs offer a critical care nurse/critical care paramedic care team.

A nurse practitioner is a Master (MSN) or Doctorate (DNP) prepared nurse with the specialized training and knowledge to make medical decisions that registered nurses may not have the training or experience to make. They must be board certified, and often are able to act as their own “medical control”, meaning they can prescribe medication and treatments independently.

“Our flight crews treat and transport some of the most challenging and complex cases we see at Vanderbilt,” says Dr. Stephan Russ, MD, associate professor of Emergency Medicine and associate chief of staff for Vanderbilt University Medical Center. “We want our referring partners and patients to know that they are getting the highest level of care offered when Vanderbilt is called to transport.”

More than 70% of the patients flown by LifeFlight originate at a community hospital and need more advanced care at a larger tertiary care center. LifeFlight will transport any patient to any medically appropriate hospital.

Photo by News Channel 5 Nashville

“They will have the complete picture of the patient status and can modify treatments in real time without delay and without having to contact additional medical control,” Dr. Russ explains. “The ability to make such split-second decisions in a life or death moment is important.”

Flight physicians are now flying at five of eight helicopter bases, including LF 1 (Gallatin/Sumner County), LF 3 (Clarksville/Montgomery County), LF 4 (Mt. Pleasant/Maury County), LF 5 (Murfreesboro/Rutherford County) and LF 7 (Cookeville/Putnam County). In all, these physicians are flying a total of about 260 hours per month.

Dr. Ashley Brown Panas, MD, assistant professor of Emergency Medicine, chief flight physician and assistant medical director of LifeFlight, says flying physicians are board certified in emergency medicine or eligible to sit for their board certification.

Since its inception in 1984, Vanderbilt LifeFlight has completed more than 45,000 accident-free patient missions. The program has grown from a single helicopter to more than eight bases across Tennessee, nine helicopters, an airplane, two critical care ground ambulances and twelve advanced life support ambulances. All air operations are provided by Air Methods Corporation. All ground and medical services are provided by Vanderbilt University Medical Center.

Vanderbilt LifeFlight expanded its services to several rural communities last year after Tennessee experienced 12 rural hospital closures.

Previous articleJustice for Brian “Egypt” Powers and Tiffany Harris
Next articleHallmark Targeted by Homophobic ‘One Million Moms’ Over LGBTQ Inclusion
Brian Sullivan is a reporter for Out & About Nashville. He has served nearly 2 decades in the television industry, with over 20 years experience as a print and broadcast journalist. Sullivan is an Emmy Award Winning producer, writer, lobbyist, activist and marketing strategist. He is active in several campaigns raising awareness in addiction treatment, equality and mental healthcare. He received recognition as a Nashville Emerging Leader of the Year at the NELA Awards. He is an Executive Board Member of the Prevention Alliance of Tennessee, a member of DrugFree Wilco, the Williamson County Anti-Drug Coalition, the Memphis Area Prevention Alliance, the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, Facing Addiction, Fed Up!, the Nashville Chamber of Commerce, the Nashville LGBT Chamber of Commerce, the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, the Center for Nonprofit Management, Music City Theatre Company, LGBTQI Nashvillians of Faith, Covenant of the Cross Ministries, Human Rights Campaign, HRC Nashville, Team Friendly Tennessee, Tennessee Equality Project, Tennessee Transgender Political Coalition, Wilson County Anti-Drug Coalition, National Fraternal Order of Police, the Nashville Filmmakers Guild and is an ordained Minister. Sullivan is a proud donor of the Memphis Hope House, Nashville Cares, Covenant Cupboard Food Pantry, and Second Harvest Food Bank. He has worked extensively on projects with several major networks including Fox News Network, CNN, Time Magazine, Washington Post, New York Times, Inside Edition and Mic.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here