A Night of Free Movies continues at The Café at Outloud!

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A Night of Free Movies is brought to you by OutCentral in conjunction with Outloud! every Thursday at The Café at Outloud from 7:00 – 10:00 pm. The event is titled “The Screening Nuns Double Header Peep Show" and will be hosted by the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence.

The event starts at 7 p.m. with select short films and offers a feature film presentation at 8 p.m. that will showcase a wide range of shorts and the best in new GLBT DVD releases and camp classics.

Ten percent of Café sales will be donated to a different charity each month. This month’s charity partner is OutCentral.

Planned features are:

  • November 1: The Gymnast
  • November 8: Outing Riley
  • November 15: Out of Hand
  • November 22: Eating Out 2: Sloppy Seconds
  • November 29: AIDS Week Special Event: Two Homelands from 6:00 to 9:00, with a discussion after.

“We have such a wonderful cross-section of the community coming to the movies – 20 to 30 people each week. It’s a wonderful event!” says Sister Enya Face, one of the event’s Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence Emcees. Jim Hawk from OutCentral says “A night of free movies provides quality programming and another option for something to do on a Thursday evening”. 

Film Summaries:

The Gymnast

The talented Jane Hawkins (Dreya Weber, Lovely & Amazing) was an impressive gymnast at the top of her game until a devastating injury ended her career. Now she pours the passion, strength and discipline that once fueled her sport into maintaining both a tedious job as a massage therapist and a loveless marriage. A chance meeting leads sets Jane on a new path: performing a CirqueDu Soleil style aerial act with a mysterious and beautiful dancer named Serena (Addie Yungmee). Each of them are illuminated by the presence of the other, but there are distractions. Jane is distressed by her lack of children while Serena is a closeted lesbian who tackles stereotypes with being an adopted Korean daughter of Jewish parents. As the stunning pair prepares to audition their act for a Las Vegas show, the gravitational pull between the two women becomes increasingly unavoidable… A visually compelling film that challenges notions of both ability and identity, The Gymnast is foremost a story about hope and taking the necessary risks to fully become yourself.

Outing Riley

A closeted Chicago architect wrestles with the prospect of coming out to his Irish Catholic brothers following the death of their parents in Stolen Summer writer/director Pete Jones’ affectionate family comedy. His entire life, Bobby Riley (Jones) has been living a lie. The product of a traditional Irish-Catholic family, Bobby is a typical guy who likes beer and loves sports. In fact, the only notable difference between Bobby and your average Chicago Irish-Catholic is that Bobby happens to be gay. For years, the only person who knew Bobby’s well-guarded secret was his sister Maggie (Julie R. Pearl) – a no-nonsense lawyer with an open mind and no time for secrets. Though his live-in boyfriend Andy (Michael McDonald) longs for the day he will be able to express his love openly, Bobby insists on projecting a heterosexual image with a little assistance from longtime lesbian gal pal Carly (Dana Gilhooley). On the heels of their father’s death, Maggie attempts to convince Bobby that the time has come to tell his brothers the truth about his lifestyle. The only problem is that Bobby’s brothers aren’t simply straight – they’re fairly narrow as well. Of course prankish Luke (Nathan Fillion) and unstable Connor (Stoney Westmoreland) could probably come to grips with the truth, but what about Jack (Dev Kennedy)? The eldest sibling and a devoted clergyman, Jack would most certainly have an adverse reaction to such a life-changing announcement. When Bobby determines to reveal his secret and becomes suddenly tongue tied at the last minute, it’s up to outspoken sister Maggie to set the record straight whether Bobby likes it or not. (Jason Buchanan, All Movie Guide)

Out of Hand

An official selection of the 2006 Philadelphia International Film Festival and the 2006 NewFest (New York), the story is of Sebastian and Paul – two teenaged troublemakers who spend their time drinking, stealing and beating people up. It’s the thrill, the sense of testing their limits… and the wolf-like nature deep inside that attracts them to each other. From the outset, Sebastian emerges as the dominant figure in the pair, because he always wants to go one step further than Paul. One day they abduct 30-year-old convenience-store clerk Sonja and drag her back to their hangout in an abandoned factory. But now, what should they do with her? Paul becomes more distant with Sebastian as he starts to feel attracted to Sonja, trying to help her as much as possible. While Sebastian, not admitting even to himself that he has fallen in love with Paul, feels hurt and jealous… and becomes capable of anything.

Eating Out 2: Sloppy Seconds

A Rubik’s Cube of shifting sexual orientation and elaborate nailing fantasies, “Eating Out 2: Sloppy Seconds” follows a young gay man who joins an “ex-gay” group in his quest to bed a hot male model. Gathering all the accoutrements of soft pornography—cheesy music, low-rent acting and attractively-framed genitals—into a plot of stunning imbecility, the director, Phillip J. Bartel, is most amusing in his zeal to demonstrate the fruitlessness of right-wing efforts to reorient gay men. (Jeannette Catsoulis, The New York Times)

Two Homelands: Cuba and the Night

In this documentary feature, director Christian Liffers explores the lives of five gay men and one transsexual woman living in Havana. Portrayed with sensitivity, each subject offers insight into the trails of living in a place where gay-themed gatherings are illegal, and homosexuality is considered wrong in the eyes of the law. A triumphant spirit and a skill for remaining under the radar, however, help these people live their lives despite extreme intolerance and oppression. (Cammila Albertson, All Movie Guide)